WALLS CAN BE MORE

BRING THE OUTSIDE INSIDE

A RELATIONSHIP WITH NATURE.
Here in the western world, we spend approximately 90% of our time, in the interiors created by the structure and shells of our buildings. Walls, being perpendicular to our normal line of sight, has the greatest effect as a spatial boundary. They limit our visual field and serve as a barrier to our movement. Bringing the outside inside through sympathetic refurbishment or remodelling re-establishes contact with surrounding interior spaces as well as the world outside. 
A living, breathing world outside that is part of Us.
If you are planning a project to improve the space, value or decor of your home or place of work, below is a visual guide that clearly presents all of the basic concepts underlying bringing the outside inside.

Fig.1 A existing south-facing external wall characterised by a less than generous window opening [2.4m²] that limits access to direct natural sunlight as well as physical connection between the front reception and the external "terrace".

Fig.2 A remodelled south-facing external wall distinguished by a generously proportioned opening [7.2m²] that brings in as much direct natural sunlight as possible. Glazed sliding panels enable fluidity and continuity between interior and exterior as well as the flexibility needed to adapt to changes in illumination and ventilation. 

Fig.3 The strategy of large openings and glazed sliding panels by Rimadesio has been extended to the existing internal wall that separates the front and rear reception. The result is semi-open plan space that can be lightly divided without destroying the concept of a generous, fluid and almost uninterrupted multi-functional space.

Fig.4 To maximise the sense of connection with the natural world, the modest front garden has been transformed through a carefully composed arrangement of gravel, rocks and bushes. The deliberate arrangement and orientation of a chaise sofa by B&B Italia, lounge chair with ottoman by Vitra and pouff by Tribu directs the gaze outward rather than inward: to the natural rather than artificial.

Fig.5 An existing rear reception visually and physically disconnected from surrounding interior and exterior spaces as well as direct natural sunlight.

Fig.6 A remodelled rear reception visually and physically disconnected from surrounding interior and exterior spaces as well as direct natural sunlight.

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Openings are crucial punctuation points within buildings, they can establish both physical and visual relationships between places.

Sally Stone

Fig.7 A dining table by More replete with four chairs by Novamobili and a freestanding unit by Rimadesio are carefully arranged in order to foster a sense of visual and physical connection with the garden, the surroundings and nature as the occupants eat or work.

Fig.8 A dining table by More replete with four chairs by Novamobili and a freestanding unit by Rimadesio are carefully arranged in order to foster a sense of visual and physical connection with the garden, the surroundings and nature as the occupants eat or work.

Fig.9 A dining table by More replete with four chairs by Novamobili and a freestanding unit by Rimadesio are carefully arranged in order to foster a sense of visual and physical connection with the garden, the surroundings and nature as the occupants eat or work.

Fig.10 A dining table by More replete with four chairs by Novamobili and a freestanding unit by Rimadesio are carefully arranged in order to foster a sense of visual and physical connection with the garden, the surroundings and nature as the occupants eat or work.

Fig. 9 Above A large opening that allows for an easy progression from indoors to outdoors and a terrace easily accessed from the main living spaces. Accentuating the relationship is a steel-wood pergola that not only provides a sense of intimacy but also serves as a structure for hanging plants.

Fig. 10 Above A low table replete with modular sofa - corner sofa, long couch, lounge bed etc.- and pouf by Tribu gives rise to the idea of an "outdoor room": a semi-sheltered area from which you can relax, dine, entertain and enjoy nature. 

Fig.11 A dining table by More replete with four chairs by Novamobili and a freestanding unit by Rimadesio are carefully arranged in order to foster a sense of visual and physical connection with the garden, the surroundings and nature as the occupants eat or work.

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