WALLS CAN BE MORE

Bringing the outside inside.


BRINGING THE OUTSIDE INSIDE
The Principles

The walls of our homes are much more than a pure vertical surface. They may be thick and heavy, expressing a clear distinction between a controlled interior environment and the exterior space from which it is isolated. On the other hand, they may be thin, even transparent, and thus blur the boundaries between architecture and nature, outside and in. 

To achieve this, Walls Can Be More developed a distinct four phase remodelling, refurbishment and extension process that takes its inspiration from historic and modern Japanese architectural art techniques that create spaces with "natural paintings" that provide us with the opportunity to reconnect our lifestyles to nature in a way that positively affects our daily lives.
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KYOKAI
A Japanese Technique For Articulating Boundaries

In Japan, special attention is given to the placement of openings, and more important the creation of boundaries. These boundaries or walls not only used various passive techniques to benefit from both the light and heat provided by the sun; they were also able to capture views and frame them like a painting on a wall.

Technical and constructional requirements include:
The simplest way of making a window larger is to lengthen it by dropping the sill and removing the area of solid wall below. This alteration has no structural implications and merely involves basic building work. 

A rather more complicated alteration is to increase the size of the window by widening the opening. This involves installing a compensating beam across the top of the new opening to bear the structural load from above. The same is true if you are creating a new opening in a wall where none has existed previously.

The act of making an opening raises the question of how to close it. The flexibility of external and internal sliding doors allows for spaces to be lightly divided without destroying the concept of a generous, fluid and almost uninterrupted space. 

Spatial Effect:
Overall, through the reconfiguration of an opening that places an emphasis on nature as well as visual and physical fluidity, both interior and exterior work as one, and through this they are able to complement each other. Furthermore, the precise design adds limits to the exterior, transforming it into a blank sheet of paper, to be completed by each person and their imagination.

Passive Effect:
Through the precise control of boundaries, a space reduces or eliminates the consumption of fossil fuels for lighting and heating by harvesting freely available natural energy in the form of light and heat from the sun.

Biophilic Effect:
In respect to the circadian rhythm, natural light can align our circadian rhythms by promoting the right balance of serotonin [daylight] and melatonin [night time]: chemicals linked to sleep quality, mood, alertness, depression, breast cancer and other health conditions. Other benefits include the absorption of Vitamin D: a critical nutrient that prevents bone loss and reduces the risk of heart disease, weight gain, and various cancers.
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WABI-SABI
A Japanese Philosophy of Aesthetics

Wabi, which roughly means "the elegant beauty of humble simplicity" and Sabi, which means "the passing of time and subsequent deterioration", were combined to form an ancient art that appreciated the undeclared beauty in the imperfections and profundity of natural materials, colours and textures.

Technical and constructional requirements include:
In keeping with the wabi-sabi of the outside world, apply to your walls a backdrop of textured, matte finishes i.e. clay, plaster and paint in a muted, down-to-earth palette that derives its hues from nature i.e. such as stone, wood and plants.

Natural stone as well as wood, stone or concrete effect ceramic floor tiles with subtle differences in tone, texture, grain and pattern will add contrast to the deliberately understated colour scheme of the walls, and at the same time, quietly complement it.

The sole material that dares to act as a supporting character is a gorgeous brown timber.

Spatial Effect:
The contrast of light [direct and diffuse sunlight] and dark [muted, down-to-earth materials and colours] creates a powerful almost "entrancing effect" that will help draw the eye and body towards sunlight, something we cannot be without.

Passive Effect:
In the heating season i.e. winter, natural materials with a high-thermal mass e.g. concrete, ceramic and stone have the capacity to absorb, store and re-radiate natural heat from the sun at night. Additionally, the matt, rough texture of the walls and floors 

Biophilic Effect:
In one study, researchers observed that a room with a moderate ratio of wood exhibited significant decreases in diastolic blood pressure and significant increases in pulse rate and a decrease in brain activity in a room with large ratios.
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NIHON TEIEN
Japanese Garden Design.
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KANSO
A Japanese Interior Concept.

Finally, and this is the most important, is the... in order to fully enjoy the view,
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WALLS CAN BE MORE
Bringing the outside inside

Registered company no. 08558415
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